Event

New Ideas on Old Wars

The Archaeology of War

People on board a ship looking at screens showing an underwater environment. ©2018 Navigea Ltd. R/V Petrel.

The Archaeology of War is a two day conference exploring the importance of archaeology in the investigation of past conflicts, how this has been affected by technological advances and what role archaeology might play in public remembrance.

Book now
  • New Ideas on Old Wars

    New Ideas on Old Wars

    June 22-23 2018

    On June 22-23 2018 the Australian National Maritime Museum will host a two day event that will investigate the relationships between public remembrance and archaeology. 

    The conference will look at the role of archaeology in a variety of conflict-related themes, including the repatriation of human remains and bringing closure to those affected by war. It will explore archaeology’s commemorative function, its role and importance in the investigation of past conflicts as well as the use of new (and future) technologies. The conference will also raise questions about how archaeology might reveal the effects of past warfare on society and what role it might play in understanding loss and grief, and shaping ways of remembrance. Read the full two day program

    Tony Pollard heads an all-star lineup

    Professor Tony PollardMusket balls found at the site of the Battle of Waterloo Image courtesy Tony Pollard

    A Remarkable Gathering of International Speakers

    Tony Pollard, Professor of Conflict Archaeology and History, and Director of the Centre for Battlefield Archaeology, University of Glasgow; RADM Peter Briggs (RAN Rtd) ex-Head of Strategic Command, Head of Submarine Capability and Head of Systems Acquisition (Submarines); Paul Bartrop, Professor of History, Director, Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Genocide Studies, Florida Gulf Coast University and Kathy Abbass, Executive Director of the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project head a remarkable gathering of international specialists speaking at New Ideas on Old WarsSee the full list of speakers

    New Ideas on Old Wars

    Highlights include new questions posed by recent advances in technology in archaeology.

    While Australian archaeology will be a focus, The Archaeology of War is not limited by scope, scale, place or time, and will feature international perspectives and examples as well as cross-cultural comparisons and connections with other disciplines.


    Get an international perspective on modern archaeology

    Prof Paul R Bartrop will talk about the excavation of the former administrative centre of the Nazi State in Berlin Image courtesy Paul R BartropMatthew Carter exploring the wreck of a World War II midget submarine off Sydney Image courtesy Steve Trewavas

    Three Main Themes

    • Management and preservation: Common issues in protecting war sites and graves
    • Interpretation: Archaeology, remembrance and the digital age, and cross-disciplinary approaches
    • Discovery: New finds, new searches, new methods

    REGISTER NOW

    New Ideas on Old Wars: The Archaeology of War features two full days of world-class speakers, and includes daily morning tea, lunch, and drinks on Friday evening. Places are limited, so book your seats now.

    Join us on 22 and 23 June at the Australian National Maritime Museum, Darling Harbour, Sydney. 

    For further information please contact archaeologyofwar@anmm.gov.au   


    Gun on the deck (with graffito) of the HSK KormoranProf Paul R Bartrop will talk about the excavation of the former administrative centre of the Nazi State in Berlin Image courtesy Paul R BartropA pilot wears a rubberised flying suit. Dr Peter Hobbins will discuss this and other Australian military aviation technologies from World War II. Image Sydney University ArchivesDr James Hunter will talk about recent expeditions to examine the wreck of HMAS Perth 1 Image Greg DeAScentisWWII tank off a beach at Saipan Northern Mariana Islands Image courtesy James HunterExamining the site of the Battle of Waterloo Image courtesy Tony PollardMusket balls found at the site of the Battle of Waterloo Image courtesy Tony PollardProfessor Tony PollardSpare halyard on the HMS Invincible courtesy of Mike PittsVeterans and archaeologists examine an excavation at the Waterloo site Image courtesy Tony PollardMaritime archaeologist and technical diver Matt Carter Image courtesy Matt CarterMatthew Carter exploring the wreck of a World War II midget submarine off Sydney Image courtesy Steve TrewavasExcavations at the Native Mounted Police barracks in Boulia, western QueenslandAt the Kokoda Track museumHMAS Sydney lies on the bottom of the ocean floor
  • READ THE TWO DAY PROGRAM

    READ THE TWO DAY PROGRAM

    The Archaeology of War

    ANMM CONFERENCE ON ARCHAEOLOGY, TECHNOLOGY AND PUBLIC REMEMBRANCE

    Musket balls found at the site of the Battle of Waterloo Image courtesy Tony Pollard
    Musket Balls at Waterloo

    PROGRAM DAY ONE Friday 22 June

    8.45–9.30 Conference registration + coffee/tea

    9.30–9.45 Welcome to Country; opening by Director; introduction and event outline

    9.45–10.20 Professor Tony Pollard Director, Centre for Battlefield Archaeology, University of Glasgow ‘I have waited patiently: The search for First World War mass graves at Fromelles, France’

    10.25–10.45 Andrew Bernie Manager, Unrecovered War Casualties – Army, Australian Army ‘“I once was lost, but now am found”: Latest directions in the search for the Australian Army’s unrecovered war casualties’

    10.50–11.10 Alison Starr Doctoral Candidate, University of Queensland ‘The enemy in our backyard: Managing the human remains of war in an Australian cemetery’

    11.20 –11.40 Morning tea

    11.45 –12.05 Dr Andrew Connelly Military Heritage Adviser, National Museum and Art Gallery, Papua New Guinea ‘Stori blo bikpela pait bilong yumi olgeta (The story of the war belongs to all of us): History, archaeology and heritage management on the Kokoda Track, PNG’

    12.10 –12.30 Matthew Kelly Senior Archaeologist, EXTENT Heritage Pty Ltd ‘Multiple voices and multiple places of the Kokoda Trail Campaign: Recent research on a Kokoda Trail battlefield at Eora Creek, PNG’

    12.35 –12.55 Ashley Matic Archaeologist ‘What’s left? An archaeological assessment of the Tadji aircraft wrecks, Sanduan Province, PNG’

    1.05–2.00 Lunch

    2.00–2.20 Matthew Carter Maritime Archaeologist, ARCHAEOTechnic ‘Underwater conflict archaeology in the age of technical exploration’

    2.25–2.45 Peter Briggs RADM RAN Rtd ‘The search for and discovery of HMAS AE1’

    2.50 – 3.10 Dr James Hunter Curator, RAN Maritime Archaeology, Australian National Maritime Museum ‘Imaging Australia’s First Naval Loss: The 2018 Archaeological Survey of Submarine AE1

    3.40–4.00 Caolan Mitchell Thylacine Design ‘Commemoration in design’

    4.05–4.25 Melissa Riley Doctoral candidate, University of Tasmania ‘Archaeology and war in the Australian curriculum: Lessons in conflict and remembrance’

    4.30–4.50 Prof Paul R Bartrop Professor of History and Director, Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Genocide Studies, Department of Social Sciences, Florida Gulf Coast University ‘In the belly of the beast: The excavation and transformation of the headquarters of the Nazi regime in Berlin’

    5.00–6.00 Drinks function

    At the Kokoda Track museum
    Kokoda Track museum

    PROGRAM DAY TWO Saturday 23 June

    8.45–9.30 Conference registration + coffee/tea

    9.30–9.45 Introduction and event outline

    9.45–10.20 Dr Kathy Abbass Executive Director, Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project (RIMAP) ‘Why is it so hard to find the Endeavour bark?: The American Revolution and the US Navy’

    10.25–10.45 Dan Pascoe, Dave Parham and Jessica Berry Maritime Archaeology Sea Trust and Bournemouth University ‘The Royal Navy’s first Invincible’ (presented by Irini Malliaros)

    10.50–11.10 Professor Tony Pollard Director, Centre for Battlefield Archaeology, University of Glasgow ‘These spots of excavation: The archaeology of the Battle of Waterloo’

    11.20 –11.40 Morning tea

    11.45 –12.05 Dr Ray Kerkhove Griffith University and Dr Stephen Gapps Australian National Maritime Museum ‘Tactics and format in traditional and frontier Aboriginal warfare’

    12.10 –12.30 Lynley Wallis Nulungu Research Institute, The University of Notre Dame, Broome Campus, WA ‘The archaeology of the “Secret War” in colonial Queensland, 1849–1904’

    12.35 –12.55 Peter Illidge Project Manager, Maritime Cultural Heritage, Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority ‘The fish are their flowers: In-situ protection of WWII aircraft wrecks and the remains of their crews within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park’

    1.05–2.00 Lunch

    2.00–2.20 Fiona Shanahan Archaeologist ‘For whose benefit and remembrance do we as heritage professionals manage and preserve WWII aviation sites?’

    2.25–2.45 Anna Gebels Doctoral Candidate, The University of Sydney ‘The archaeology of war on the home front: the Empire Air Training Scheme, remembrance and the airshow’

    2.50 – 3.10 Dr Peter Hobbins Department of History, The University of Sydney ‘Unearthing airspace: the historical phenomenology of aviation artefacts’

    3.40–4.00 Natali Pearson Doctoral Candidate, Museum and Heritage Studies, University of Sydney ‘Not our history, not our heritage: new perspectives on WWII ships in Indonesia’

    4.05–4.25 Kieran Hosty Manager Maritime Archaeology Program, Australian National Maritime Museum ‘Protection for the remains of HMAS Perth (1)’

    The Archaeology of War conference is supported by the Australian National Maritime Foundation.


  • SPEAKER LINEUP

    SPEAKER LINEUP

    New Ideas, Old Wars – The Archaeology of War: Presenters

    Tony Pollard
    Professor of Conflict Archaeology and History, and Director of the Centre for Battlefield Archaeology, University of Glasgow

    His research interests range from 18th century warfare, particularly in relation to the Jacobite rebellions in Scotland, to the cultural heritage of the Falklands War. In 2007-8 he directed the survey and evaluation that brought to light the First World War mass graves of Australian troops at Fromelles, in France. He is currently lead academic for Waterloo Uncovered, a project engaging military veterans in the archaeological investigation of the iconic 1815 battlefield. Professor Pollard has written widely for both popular and academic audiences and is co-founder and co-editor of the Journal of Conflict Archaeology. 

    Andrew Bernie
    Manager, Unrecovered War Casualties-Army

    Mr Andrew Bernie is the manager of Unrecovered War Casualties-Army, a position he has held since early 2017. His research interests include geospatial analysis of Australian Army’s missing soldiers, Second World War Papua New Guinea and the use of emerging technology to assist in locating the missing.

    Alison Starr
    University of Queensland

    Alison works in the public sector as a built heritage specialist, with a discipline background in architecture and Asian Studies. She is a doctoral candidate in the School of Architecture at the University of Queensland, and her research is focussed on war memory, post-war reconciliation and military mortuary practices of the Asia Pacific War, looking at the significance of the human remains of war located on enemy territory.

    Andrew Connelly
    Military Heritage Adviser, National Museum and Art Gallery, PNG

    Andrew holds an MA in Anthropology (CSU Sacramento) and a PhD in Pacific History (Australian National University). He did his doctorate on colonial and indigenous histories in the Trobriand Islands, PNG, along the way picking up an interest in the memories and remains of WWII in the Pacific, especially in regard to indigenous populations. He has lectured in New Zealand, Fiji and the USA, and is currently with the PNG National Museum and Art Gallery (NMG) assisting in the development of a sustainable military heritage management plan for the Kokoda Track.

    Matthew Kelly
    Senior Archaeologist, EXTENT Heritage

    Matthew Kelly is an experienced historical archaeologist with 30 years of excavation and survey experience both in Australia and Europe. Matthew has been involved as an archaeological consultant in Australia for most of his professional life.  He has excavated a number of major historic sites such as: the military sites of Fort Denison, Bradleys Head, and Goat Island; Convict sites such as the Convict Lumberyard and Palais Royale sites in Newcastle, Castle Hill Heritage Park; and early colonial sites in the Sydney region such as, Rouse Hill House, Mean Fiddler Inn, Macquarie Fields House, and Norfolk House, Parramatta.  In 2002 he undertook a survey of the industrial and military sites on Christmas Island.  More recently his international work has been focussed on the survey of WW2 battlefield and defence sites in PNG near Eora Creek  on the Kokoda Track and Hombrom Bluff - outside Port Moresby. He is also currently surveying WW1 sites, at Mouquet Farm and Vaulx Vraucourt, in Northern France, colonial and WW2 sites in East New Britain and is heading an archaeological team endeavouring to identify and repatriate five Australians killed on Nauru during WW2 by the Japanese.

    Ashley Matic
    Forensic Archaeologist, Royal Australian Air Force – Specialist Reserve

    Ashley is a practicing archaeologist based in Melbourne, Victoria, with a strong interest in aviation heritage; specifically, the investigation of aircraft wrecks as archaeological sites. Through his work as a member of the RAAF Specialist Reserve he has been able to travel to various locations throughout Australia and the South-western Pacific, in the course of which he has been able to visit and document many aircraft wrecks and aviation heritage sites, ranging from hulks in remote jungles through to wreckage identified in roadside rubbish tips. Ashley also runs his own consultancy providing cultural heritage management advice to clients throughout South-eastern Australia, including the World Heritage listed Port Arthur Historic Site in Tasmania.

    Matthew Carter
    Maritime Archaeologist, ARCHAEOTechnic

    Matthew is the leading technical diving maritime archaeologist in Australasia. He is vice-president of the Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology, and the New Zealand representative on the International Committee on Underwater Cultural Heritage. Matt is passionate about furthering the links between archaeological research and the technical diving community. He is currently completing his PhD and is also leading projects to 3D map deep shipwrecks around Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific.

    RADM Peter Briggs
    RAN Rtd

    Peter Briggs served 40 years in the RAN (34 in submarines) commanding Oberon class submarines Otway and Oxley, going on to command the RAN’s submarine squadron before becoming successively Head of Strategic Command, Head of Submarine Capability and Head of Systems Acquisition (Submarines).

    James Hunter
    Curator RAN Maritime Archaeology, Australian National Maritime Museum

    James is the inaugural Curator of RAN Maritime Archaeology at the Australian National Maritime Museum. He received his MA in historical archaeology from the University of West Florida, and holds a PhD in maritime archaeology from Flinders University, where he is an Associate Lecturer in the Department of Archaeology.

    Caolán Mitchell
    Thylacine Director and Designer

    Caolán has worked in the exhibitions industry for the past 25 years his breadth of experience encompasses design, project management, implementation and fabrication.  He established Thylacine in 1999 and over the past nineteen years has developed the practice into a nationally renowned design and implementation firm with offices in Canberra and Melbourne.

    Melissa Riley
    University of Tasmania

    Melissa is an archaeologist and History teacher with a special interest in archaeology education. Melissa actively promotes archaeology as a heuristic for teaching history through her Directorial role in the HTA NSW, the Australian National Committee for Archaeology Teaching and Learning, and convening the biennial archaeology conference Archaeomeet. Most recently, she has been delivering experiential teacher professional learning through the ‘Dirty Weekend of Archaeology at Willow Court’, and ‘Excavating Convict Lives: Archaeology Professional Learning for Teachers’. Melissa has commenced a PhD at UTAS, looking at the place of archaeology within teacher professional learning and how this translates to classroom settings.

    Paul R Bartrop
    Professor of History, Director, Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Genocide Studies, Florida Gulf Coast University

    Dr. Paul Bartrop is a multi-award winning scholar of the Holocaust and genocide. He is the author or editor of 18 books, the most recent of which are: The Evian Conference of 1938 and the Jewish Refugee Crisis (2017); The Holocaust: A Resource and Document Collection (4 volumes, 2017); Resisting the Holocaust: Upstanders, Partisans, and Survivors (2016).

    In addition, he has published numerous scholarly articles in journals and books. A senior consultant of the Jewish Holocaust Centre, Melbourne, Professor Bartrop is currently Vice-President of the Midwest Jewish Studies Association, and is a Past President of the Australian Association of Jewish Studies.

    Kathy Abbass
    Executive Director, Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project (RIMAP)

    Kathy established the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project (RIMAP) in 1992. RIMAP has no funding from the state budget and depends on memberships, federal grants, and donations to pay its costs, but the greatest support comes from the more than 900 volunteers who have participated in our various activities over the years. Over the past 24 years we have studied more than 90 sites in Rhode Island and the region. I am the scholar who proved that the Lord Sandwich  transport (sunk in Newport Harbor in 1778) had been Capt. Cook's Endeavour Bark, and I direct the ongoing archaeological research process to find that iconic vessel.

    Dan Pascoe, Dave Parham and Jessica Berry*
    Maritime Archaeology Trust and Bournemouth University, United Kingdom
    (*Paper presented by Irini Malliaros – Silentworld Foundation)

    Daniel Pascoe

    Daniel Pascoe. A Reach Fellow at Bournemouth University and Director of Pascoe Archaeology, He has extensive maritime archaeological experience and is the nominated archaeologist for the designated sites of the Northumberland (wrecked 1703), the Hazardous (wrecked 1706) and the London (wrecked 1665). Pascoe is also the Licensee and archaeologist for HMS Invincible and co-chair of the Licensees’ Association.

    Jessica Berry

    Jessica Berry is founder and CEO of MAST. She took a Masters at Flinders University in Australia after which she worked internationally as a maritime archaeologist, first in Australia, then as a freelance maritime archaeologist in Ireland before working for Wessex Archaeology and then at the Association for the Development of Maritime Archaeological Research (Adramar) in France. She is the archaeological advisor for the 1685 Coronation wreck in Cornwall. She conceived and has managed MAST and all its projects since its inception in 2011

    Dave Parham

    Dave Parham. An Associate Professor in Maritime Archaeology at Bournemouth University. He has directed maritime archaeological projects that range in date from the Bronze Age to the Second World War and has worked extensively throughout the British Isles as well as the Baltic, Mediterranean, Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea. His research interests focus on the archaeology of seafaring and ship construction of all periods.

    Ray Kerkhove
    Griffith University

    Ray Kerkhove is a consultant and cultural researcher, currently a visiting Fellow at Griffith University. He is often called upon to give public talks or historical reports on specific locations. He specializes in the early history and material culture of Aboriginal South-east Queensland, including Aboriginal-settler conflict. He occasionally writes on religious history.

    Stephen Gapps
    Curator, Australian National Maritime Museum

    Stephen is an historian whose work has been published widely. In 2011 he won the NSW Premiers History Prize for Regional and Community history with his book Cabrogal to Fairfield – A history of a multicultural community. Stephen has current research interests in early colonial Australian military history. His most recent book is The Sydney Wars – Conflict in the early colony 1788 – 1817 (NewSouth 2018)

    Lynley Wallis
    Nulungu Research Institute, University of Notre Dame

    Dr Lynley Wallis is currently a Research Fellow in the Nulungu Research Institute at the University of Notre Dame Australia. An archaeologist with degrees from the University of the Western Australia and the Australian National University, Lynley has worked on projects with Indigenous communities across Australia, as well as working on historic sites in WA, SA and Tasmania. A key element to Lynley’s research in recent years has been ensuring that projects are collaborative and community driven, the latter being the impetus for her and her colleagues’ current project on the archaeology of the Native Mounted Police in Queensland.

    Peter Illidge
    Project Manager, Maritime Cultural Heritage, Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

    Peter is a maritime archaeologist and specialist in the maritime history and archaeology of northern Australia. His research interests include World War II aircraft wreckage in northern Australia. He is currently the project manager responsible for Maritime cultural heritage, with the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority in Townsville.

    Fiona Shanahan
    Independent researcher

    Fiona has been working as a consulting archaeologist throughout Australia over the past five years. Since the completion of her honours thesis, Fiona has continued researching the World War II airbase Coomalie, its living history and associated community.

    Anna Gebels
    University of Sydney

    Anna Gebels is a PhD candidate at the University of Sydney. Her research is focused on the collected heritage of the Empire Air Training Scheme in Australia in an attempt to ascertain what we have, and what we need in order to tell an inclusive account of the Scheme. By day Anna is a museum curator and educator who has worked in quarantine, military aviation and medical museums. By night Anna enjoys singing for and with military veterans, transporting them to yesteryear with the sweet harmonies of the WWII era.

    Peter Hobbins
    Department of History, University of Sydney

    Peter Hobbins is a historian of science, technology and medicine. Drawing on both textual sources and material culture, his current postdoctoral project explores aircraft accidents and the development of aviation safety in Australia over 1920–71. Peter has worked extensively with archaeologists, including a major 3-year project to document historic inscriptions at Sydney’s former Quarantine Station. Co-authored with archaeologists Ursula K Frederick and Anne Clarke, his trade book, Stories from the Sandstone, won the NSW Community and Regional History Prize in the 2017 Premier’s History Awards.

    Natali Pearson
    Museum and Heritage Studies, University of Sydney

    Natali Pearson is a PhD Candidate in the Museum and Heritage Studies program at the University of Sydney. Her research is focused on underwater cultural heritage in Indonesia. She is co-founder of Perspectives on the Past of Southeast Asia, a research group within the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre.

    Kieran Hosty
    Manager maritime archaeology, Australian National Maritime Museum

    Kieran has worked on many maritime archaeological projects both in Australia and overseas including the survey and excavation of the Sydney Cove (1797), HMS Pandora (1791) and HMCS Mermaid (1829) and the hunt for Cook’s Endeavour in the USA.

    He is the author of the book Dunbar 1857: Disaster on our doorstep which has been published by the Museum along with two children’s books on Australian convicts and 19th century migrants published by McMillan.



  • Accommodation

    Accommodation