Event

Women in Science Symposium

International Women’s day 2016

Image of a female student raising her hand in class

In partnership with UNSW, our Symposium will encourage girls to embark on careers in science. Photo: (c) Maja Baska 2014.

  • About

    About

    For International Women’s Day the Australian National Maritime Museum, in partnership with the University of New South Wales is hosting a Women in Science Symposium. The aim is to encourage high school girls to look beyond the lab coats and to see the possibilities for careers in science.

    Chaired by Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla, UNSW, the morning session will have a range of speakers from diverse areas including marine science, climate, ecology and innovation.

    The afternoon session will provide students with opportunities to talk with the morning’s panellists and representatives from industry, find out about internships, mentoring pathways and competitions for women in science. Students will also have an exclusive tour of the museum’s Wharf 7 Heritage precinct, the conservation lab and view collection items currently not on display to the public.

    This free symposium for high school girls will be presented at the Australian National Maritime Museum. Afternoon tea will be provided; students can bring or buy their own lunch from the range of options nearby in the lunch break.


    Event information

    Who: Targeting female stage 5/6 students

    Date: Tuesday 8 March

    Time: 9.30am–3.30pm

    Cost: Free

    Where: Australian National Maritime Museum. See our Plan Your Visit page for everything you need to know about a trip to the museum.

    Bookings: Limited spaces are available. Please book through our Booking Officer on 9298 3655 or bookings@anmm.gov.au

    On Twitter? Follow @ANMMedu and join the conversation with the hashtags #science5050 #iwd2016 #unswscience #anmm

    Live video streaming

    Women in science panel

    Can’t make it to the museum in Sydney? We'll be streaming the morning session via YouTube live, from 10am AEST, 8 March 2016.

    Watch the live stream.

    Schedule for the day

    9.30am

    Registration opens 

    10am–12pm: Morning Session

    10.00am – Acknowledgement of Country by Donna Carstens, ANMM Indigenous Manager

    10.02am – Welcome by ANMM Assistant Director, Michael Harvey

    10.05am – Address by The Hon. Pru Goward MP, Minister for Mental Health, Minister for Medical Research, Assistant Minister for Health, Minister for Women, and Minister for the Prevention of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault

    10.15am – Address by Professor Merlin Crossley, Dean UNSW Science 

    Guest speaker 10 minute talks (includes 2 minute Q&A) facilitated by Veena Sahajwalla

    10.35am – John Barbagallo, Arrium

    10.45am – Lynette Clunies-Ross, SAS

    10.55am - Roger Leigh, Cochlear

    11.05am - Lauren Sullivan, UNSW Student and NYSF representative 

    11.15am – Dr Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick, UNSW Climate Change

    11.25am – Professor Rob Brooks, UNSW Evolution & Ecology

    11.35am – Dr Linda Armbrecht, Macquarie University Marine Science

    11.45am - Mike Millen, CSIRO 

    11.55am – Science 50:50 New Innovators competition awards presentation of certificates, facilitated by Veena Sahajwalla

    12.15–1pm: Lunch
    1–3.30pm: Afternoon Session

    • Industry representatives career expo. Meet representatives from CSIRO Agriculture, NSWBC (NSW Business Chamber), Ramaciotti Centre for Genomics, UNSW Australia, Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute, Engineers Australia, NSW Health, AMSI, CSIRO Intelligent Mining and Resource Management / Mineral Resources National Research Flagship, CBA, UNSW Innovations, L'Oreal, IBM, UNSW Medicine, and Woolworths. 
    • Science Communicators  ANMM, Fizzics Education
    • Conservation lab tours in the Wharf 7 Heritage Precinct
    • Afternoon tea with the morning speakers
    • Museum visits
    3.30pm: Close

    Presenters and Panellists

    Veena Sahajwalla
    Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla
    University of New South Wales

    Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla’s research interests include sustainability of materials and processes with emphasis on environmental benefits. She is an international award winning engineer who has widely presented on her research and experiences throughout the world and has published in excess of 200 papers in journals and conference proceedings. As the Director of the SMaRT Centre (Sustainable Materials Research & Technology) and Associate Dean (Strategic Industry Relations) faculty of Science, UNSW, Veena provides leadership in research programs on sustainable materials, with strong emphasis on the science urgently needed to enhance sustainability.

    She is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Laureate Fellow (2014). In 2013, Veena won AIST Howe Memorial Lecture Award. In 2012 she was named Overall Winner of the Australian Innovation Challenge Awards for tackling real world problems with imaginative solutions that offer positive environmental and community benefits. She was awarded the 2012 Banksia Award, the GE Eco Innovation Award for Individual Excellence, and the 2012 CRC Australian Collaborative Innovation Award.  She also won the won the National Nokia Business Innovation Award and the Pravasi Bhartiya Samman Award from the Indian Government in 2011. In 2005 she received the Eureka Prize for Scientific Research.

    Veena has a MASc, Metals and Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, Canada; and PhD, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, USA.


    Lynette Clunies-Ross
    Lynette Clunies-Ross
    Chief Operating Officer, SAS Australia and New Zealand

    Lynette Clunies-Ross joined SAS in 2012 as the Chief Operating Officer for SAS Australia and New Zealand.

    With over 20 years’ experience in the IT industry, Lynette is a proven and innovative business leader with a unique blend of deep technology, business and operational expertise.

    Lynette brings to SAS an integrated and holistic approach to marketing and sales strategy and execution. As a recognised thought leader in client partnering and collaboration, Lynette is tasked with leading SAS’ marketing, Financial Services, and Energy & Utilities industry business development, sales support & operations. To enable SAS growth as the premier provider of advanced analytics, Lynette’s responsibilities also include building SAS partner and business analytics advisory organisational capability.

    Prior to SAS, Lynette spent 22 years at IBM starting as a Systems Engineer before assuming a number of senior executive sales, operations, strategy & transformation roles in Australia/New Zealand and most recently on assignment for over 5 years in the IBM Growth Markets Unit based in Shanghai, China. 

    Lynette is a graduate of the international Australian Institute of Company Directors and a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management. She graduated with a Bachelor of Business (Computing) from Charles Darwin University and has completed company sponsored leadership & executive development programs with the University of Virginia Darden Graduate School of Business and Harvard Business School.


    Sarah Kirkpatrick
    Dr Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick
    ARC DECRA fellow, University of New South Wales

    Sarah is a senior research associate and 2014 DECRA awardee in the Climate Change Research Centre at UNSW. Sarah has undertaken two postdocs at the CSIRO division of Marine and Atmospheric Research, as well as the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science.  Due to her research activities and communication profile, Sarah was named a 2013 NSW Young Tall Poppy. Her research interests reside in temperature extremes, namely heatwaves. Sarah has investigated trends in heatwaves both globally and over Australia, as well as exploring the role of human activity behind such changes. Her research program includes understanding future changes in heatwaves, and how they may be driven by humans, as well as meteorological systems and natural climate phenomena.


    Robert Brooks
    Scientia Professor Robert Brooks
    University of New South Wales

    I am an evolutionary biologist who studies the evolutionary consequences of sex. These include: the evolution of mate choice, the costs of being attractive, sexual conflict, the reason animals age and the links between sex, diet, obesity and death.

    Together with my fabulous research group (the SEX LAB) and collaborators, I explore the evolutionary and ecological consequences of sexual reproduction. I love curiosity-driven research, and my funding tends to come from fundamental research funding programs like the ARC‘s Discovery program. I am motivated to study evolution because of its power to help us understand both nature and the human condition. At the moment I am especially interested in the interactions between evolution and economics, the evolution of human life histories, the reasons for sex differences in aging and longevity, the unfolding obesity crisis, the relationship between evolution and equity feminism, the evolution of human bodies, the purpose of Rock ‘n’ Roll, and what we can and cannot infer about morality from studying the natural world.

    My first book – Sex, Genes & Rock ‘n’ Roll: How Evolution has Shaped the Modern World - won the 2012 Queensland Literary Award for Science Writing. I also write a regular column for The Conversation calle Natural History of the Present on how an evolutionary view can help us understand our modern world and the lives we lead. I received the 2013 Eureka Prize for Communicating Science & Research.

    We do most of our research on guppies, field crickets and mice, and we have a variety of projects on humans (you can take part in our studies).  I am Professor of Evolution and Director of the Evolution & Ecology Research Centre at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

    If you tweet, then please follow @Brooks_Rob on Twitter.


    John Barbagallo
    John Barbagello
    Chief Executive, Mining Consumables

    Mr Barbagallo joined Arrium in August 2005 and has been General Manager of the Rod and Bar and Moly-Cop Australasian businesses. Prior to joining Arrium, John has worked for Rio Tinto and Xstrata where he held the roles of General Manager – Port Waratah Coal Services, Managing Director of Anglesey Aluminium and a number of line management roles in Aluminium and Coal Mining across Australia, New Zealand and the UK.


    Fiona Cameron
    Dr Fiona Cameron
    ARC Executive Director for Biological Sciences and Biotechnology

    Dr Fiona Cameron joined the ARC in July 2012 as Executive Director for Biological Sciences and Biotechnology. Prior to this, Dr Cameron led the Innovation & Consulting Unit at the University of Western Sydney (UWS) as the Associate Director. In this role, she worked closely with the University Executive, academics, active researchers and the University Research Office at UWS to identify opportunities to protect, develop and commercialise Intellectual Property and to build relationships with Industry and Government.

    Between 1986 and 2007 Dr Cameron worked at the CSIRO, where she was appointed a Principal Research Scientist of its Division of Molecular Science, and a member of the executive team of the CSIRO National Research Food Futures Flagship. Dr Cameron was also a key developer of the CSIRO Nanotechnology Centre. Active in gene control research, Dr Cameron's work at CSIRO included the development of molecules for better gene delivery into cells and gene therapy.

    Being heavily involved in commercially funded medical research, Dr Cameron's most recent publications take the form of a suite of patents.

    Dr Cameron originally trained at the University of Sydney and the Australian National University. She was awarded a Doctor of Philosophy in 1990 from Macquarie University, having studied the regulation of gene control using engineered ribonucleic acids.


    Roger Leigh
    Mr Roger Leigh
    Senior Manager, Implants Mechanical, Cochlear Limited

    Roger moved from the UK and joined Cochlear in 1994, where he now leads a team of engineers, scientists and technicians. His team has responsibility for all mechanical design aspects of Cochlear’s implanted products including development of new cochlear implants.

    Roger is a named inventor on over 20 patents and has had technology and project oversight for a number of Cochlear’s current products, including the company’s flagship ‘Profile’ implant.  Roger has also been sponsor to a number of male and female graduate engineers, helping guide their career through their first years with Cochlear.


    Mike Millen
    Mike Millen
    Group leader (On-Line Analysis), Intelligent Mining and Resource Management Program, CSIRO

    Mike Millen joined CSIRO in 1982 as a research projects officer. In the 1980s he worked on the development of Gamma and X-rays system for coal industry. Through the 1990s Mr Millen led significant external funded projects on the development analysis systems.

    He took a senior management in CSIRO in the year 2000 as strategic research platform (SRP) manager for the “particle sizing mass flow and complex systems” platform.

    He was appointed as leader of the OLA (On-line analysis) in 2007. The group has had a sustained level of success in the development and commercialisation of novel on-line analysis systems for use in the coal, minerals & mining, and security industries.

    Dr Linda Armbrecht

    Dr Linda Armbrecht
    Macquarie University

    Linda Armbrecht is a phytoplankton ecologist, who initially became involved in the research field of marine biology during her Bachelor studies at the University of Osnabrück, Germany (BSc Biology of Organisms). Subsequently, she was one of 10 annually selected students for the Master of Marine Biology programme at the University of Bremen, Germany. Here she soon specialised in phytoplankton ecology and biological oceanography. She conducted her Master thesis jointly at the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) branches Bremerhaven and Helgoland, Germany, investigating cell death, mucilage and aggregate formation in the temperate diatom species Coscinodiscus wailesii.

    In 2010 Linda was awarded one of the highly competitive international Macquarie University Research Excellence Scholarships (iMQRES), enabling her to conduct her doctorate on coastal phytoplankton and oceanography of Eastern Australia. Her PhD thesis provides the first phytoplankton survey in the tropical-temperate transition zone of Eastern Australia, where the strengthening of the East Australian Current appears to enhance the tropicalisation of primary producers along the Australian east coast. Since the completion of her PhD, Linda is working as Research Fellow in the Marine and Coastal Phytoplankton Lab at Macquarie University, where she investigates modern and fossilised phytoplankton from the Southern Ocean and Antarctica. These studies will provide insights into past and present climatic changes and sea ice extents in the Antarctic region.

  • Past events

    Past events

    2015

    Friday 6 March, from 11.00am


    Girls are born problem solvers and, more than ever, they want to make a difference in their world, making them natural scientists and innovators. It’s up to us to harness their talent and energy with hands-on experiences, real-world role models and a focus on the possibilities that science can make in their lives and the lives of others”.
    – Eileen Sweeney, 2008

    "We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology."
    – Carl Sagan, Scientist and Astronomer (1934-1996)


    With the current research indicating a trend for young female students to opt out of science in the senior secondary years, the Australian National Maritime Museum in conjunction with the University of New South Wales is hosting a Women in Science Symposium to encourage high school girls to look beyond the lab coats and see the possibilities for scientific careers.

    The Symposium will also play host to the Sydney launch of UNSW's Science 50:50 program with panellists from industry meeting together to discuss internships, mentoring pathways, networks and competitions for women in science.

    Science 50:50 is a program that aims to inspire young women to pursue degrees and careers in science and technology so they can succeed in an innovation-driven future. Science 50:50 makes the simple point – since half the population is female, why not half the scientists and technologists? By informing and engaging young women with the power of science and technology to solve complex problems and transform lives, and by introducing them to Australian scientists and innovators who are doing just that, Science 50:50 can help recalibrate the gender balance.


    Booking and Video Conference information

    Sorry! Booked out.

    Can’t get here? We're offering a FREE VIDEO CONFERENCE of the 11.30am and 1.30pm sessions. Please register with DARTconnections


    Schedule for the day

    10.00am – Possible Museum and lab tours with Maritime staff, depending on numbers (bookings essential).

    10.45am – Students begin arriving at the museum. 

    11.15am – General introduction.

    11.30am – Presentation by panel scientists with a discussion chaired by Veena Sahajwalla, Director of the SMaRT Centre (Sustainable Materials Research & Technology) and Associate Dean (Strategic Industry Relations) faculty of Science, UNSW.

    12.30pm – Lunch break / Museum and lab tours with Maritime staff, depending on numbers (bookings essential).

    1.30pm  – UNSW's Science 50:50 program launch. 

    1.40pm Keynote address by Professor Merlin Crossley, Dean UNSW Science.

    1.50pm – Industry talks with partners CSIRO, IBM, Cochlear, Woolworths, Arrium, Brickworks, Australian Museum Research Institute, Global Product Stewardship Council.

    2.30pm – Q&A and panel discussion hosted by Prof. Veena Sahajwalla

    3.00pm – Afternoon tea. Industry meet and greet afternoon tea proudly supported by Arrium.


    Presenters / Panellists

     Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla
    Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla
    Director of the SMaRT Centre (Sustainable Materials Research & Technology) and Associate Dean (Strategic Industry Relations) faculty of Science, UNSW.

    Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla’s research interests include sustainability of materials and processes with emphasis on environmental benefits. She is an international award winning engineer who has widely presented on her research and experiences throughout the world and has published in excess of 200 papers in journals and conference proceedings. As the Director of the SMaRT Centre (Sustainable Materials Research & Technology) and Associate Dean (Strategic Industry Relations) faculty of Science, UNSW, Veena provides leadership in research programs on sustainable materials, with strong emphasis on the science urgently needed to enhance sustainability.

    She is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Laureate Fellow (2014). In 2013, Veena won AIST Howe Memorial Lecture Award. In 2012 she was named Overall Winner of the Australian Innovation Challenge Awards for tackling real world problems with imaginative solutions that offer positive environmental and community benefits. She was awarded the 2012 Banksia Award, the GE Eco Innovation Award for Individual Excellence, and the 2012 CRC Australian Collaborative Innovation Award.  She also won the won the National Nokia Business Innovation Award and the Pravasi Bhartiya Samman Award from the Indian Government in 2011. In 2005 she received the Eureka Prize for Scientific Research.

    Veena has a MASc, Metals and Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, Canada; and PhD, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, USA.

     Dr Katherine Dafforn
    Dr Katherine Dafforn
    Researcher at the University of New South Wales and Sydney Institute of Marine Science

    “My marine career aspirations began at the age of 17 on a chilly dive in Cornwall, UK. After high school I spent 2 years collecting marine experience and qualifications in the Caribbean and the Whitsunday Islands. My academic career has been based at UNSW, but I have collaborated with researchers in Canada, Italy and Singapore. My research interests include invasive species, marine artificial structures, green engineering, stormwater pollution, estuary health monitoring tools, marine debris and microplastics. A ‘normal’ workday for me could include meetings with students, reading scientific literature, exploring data or fieldwork on and under the water."

     Dr Inke Falkner
    Dr Inke Falkner
    Community outreach coordinator at the Sydney Institute of Marine Science

    “I am a marine biologist by training and a PhD in marine science brought me to Australia. After a short stint in research and working as a consultant for Geoscience Australia I began working in science outreach and communication coordinated at the University of Sydney. In this role I developed a multidisciplinary postgraduate program in marine science and management and hosted numerous outreach events. In August 2012 I was offered the position of community outreach coordinator at the Sydney Institute of Marine Science. I have since developed an extensive marine science program for primary and high school students, an educational harbour cruise featuring the amazing underwater world of Sydney Harbour and am currently curating the content for an interpretive centre at the Institute."

     Dr. Katy Croff Bell
    Dr Katy Croff Bell, Ph.D.
    Expedition Leader Vice President & Chief Scientist Ocean Exploration Trust

    Dr. Katy Croff Bell is an ocean explorer, using deep sea technology to explore what lies at the depths of the ocean. Over the past thirteen years, she has participated in or led more than 25 oceanographic and archaeological projects. Katy’s current work involves the utilization of telepresence technology on ocean exploration projects for remote science and education. She is Chief Scientist of the Nautilus Exploration Program, working with a large team to implement this technology on multidisciplinary expeditions to the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. The expedition will be shared with the world live, revealing the wonders of the undersea world in real time, in an effort to engage and inspire a new generation of young explorers.

    Katy received her S.B. from MIT in Ocean Engineering in 2000. In 2001, she was a John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, after which she completed her Master's degree in Maritime Archaeology at the University of Southampton. Katy completed her Ph.D. in Geological Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography in 2011. She is a 2006 National Geographic Emerging Explorer and 2014 MIT Media Lab Director's Fellow.

     Rebecca Dallwitz
    Rebecca Dallwitz
    ANMM conservator

    Rebecca Dallwitz has worked at the Australian National Maritime Museum for 4 years as an objects conservator, and runs the maritime archaeological conservation program.  She previously worked for organisations including the Australian War Memorial and the National Gallery of Australia.  She completed an MA (Cultural Materials Conservation) at the University of Melbourne in 2007.  Her masters thesis looked at the community use and care of processional Chinese dragons in Melbourne.  She is the third generation of her family to work in a science-based discipline.

     Micheline Nicole Jenner
    Mrs. Micheline-Nicole Jenner
    Marine Biologist and Co-Principal Investigator, Centre for Whale Research (Western Australia) Inc.

    Due to work commitments Micheline will no longer be to attend, however, we will show a 5 minute video on Micheline and her work.

    Born in Double Bay, NSW from 15 months of age Micheline grew up in Auckland, NZ attending the University of Auckland, NZ where she received a B.Sc. in Zoology in 1985 and in 1987 an M.Sc. in Marine Biology.

    Micheline has worked professionally as a cetacean researcher since 1987, firstly in Maui, Hawaii where she met Curt, her husband of 25 years. Since 1990 Micheline and Curt have studied humpback whales and pygmy blue whales in Western Australia, forming their research group Centre for Whale Research (WA) Inc. CWR has employed a variety of research techniques including behavioural observations, photo-identification techniques, biopsy sampling and deploying satellite tags to determine life history data and provide integral information for state and federal governments regarding habitat usage by humpback whales and pygmy blue whales.

    Collaborating with colleagues at Curtin University in various research projects, Micheline is a Visiting Adjunct Research Fellow at Curtin University, Western Australia.

    Currently Micheline and Curt support Australian Defence Force exercises with their specialised vessel, and as well, they are able to collect world-class, biological acoustic data across open oceans and coastal seas.

     Astha Singh
    Astha Singh

    Astha Singh completed her Masters in research on Cotton Xanthomonas bacteria from India and PHD in Plant Pathology on White Rust of Brassica crops from University of Sydney, both on a merit scholarships. Astha has presented her work in International conferences in Edinburgh, Lisbon, India and Australia. She has worked as a Teaching fellow at the University of Sydney, Faculty of Ag and Envt, and as a Professional officer at UTS, climate change cluster. Astha has been offered the All India Women’s Fellowship at the Government of India, department of science in 2013.

    She in particular is keen in communicating science to the public in innovative ways and the involvement of women in science is of prime importance and she believes that in today’s world women pursue some of the greatest careers in science. Astha strongly believes in pursuing a passion whether it is agriculture, marine science, environmental science or any other area as females are doing exceptionally well in all.

     Emma Johnson
    Professor Emma Johnston
    Australia's leading investigator of human impacts on marine systems.

    Professor Johnston is a marine ecologist and eco-toxicologist at UNSW Australia, where she is Head of the Applied Marine and Estuarine Ecology Group. Her research group investigates the ecology of human impacts in marine systems, and they approach this research from both an ecological and ecotoxicological perspective using field experimentation wherever possible. Recently they've been studying marine bioinvasion, Antarctic marine communities and the health of estauries.

    Professor Johnston is also the inaugural Director of the Sydney Harbour Research Program at the Sydney Institute of Marine Science. In 2014 The Australian Academy of Science awarded her the Inaugural Nancy Millis Medal for Women in Science.

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